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Journal of Failure Analysis and Prevention

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 304–314 | Cite as

Analyzing the Failure of Welded Steel Components in Construction Systems

  • Daniel J. Thomas
Technical Article---Peer-Reviewed
  • 190 Downloads

Abstract

Failure of welded construction steel components can occur due to inappropriate design, wrong steel choice or quality, substandard welding processes and through defective maintenance. Welded constructional steel joints in particular are highly sensitive to issues of fatigue, weld corrosion and/or weld quality. A key concern is on placing welds in regions of nominal stress. Welded joints are produced to a specification, which is used to minimize the heat-affected zone and any residual stress within the weld. In this article, numerous examples of weld fracture are shown together with the causes and of weld failure.

Keywords

Welded joints Steel structures Fracture Fatigue cracks 

List of symbols

Y

Shape factor

N

Number of cycles

a & b

Half-length of the crack

m & C

Constants of paris equation

σmσb

Nominal membrane and shell bending stress

YmYb

Correction function membrane and bending stress intensity factor

σ

Stress

da/dN

Crack growth millimeter per minute

K

Stress intensity factor

G

Strain energy release rate

Mk,m

Correction factor for the local membrane and bending stress concentration due to the weld profile

Mk,b

Correction factor for the local membrane and bending stress concentration due to the weld profile

K

Change in stress intensity factor

E

Young’s modulus

dU

Strain energy

dA

Area of fatigue crack

LEFM

Linear elastic fracture mechanics

EPFM

Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics

S-N

Stress life

E-N

Strain life

SHSS

Structural hot spot stress

GMAW

Gas metal arc welding or

SMAW

Shielded metal arc welding

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Copyright information

© ASM International 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Creation Engineering GroupLlynfi Enterprise CentreMaestegUK

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