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Sustaining the Operations of Community Indicators Projects: The Case of Twin Cities Compass

  • Craig HelmstetterEmail author
  • Paul Mattessich
  • Andi Egbert
  • Susan Brower
  • Nancy Hartzler
  • Jennifer Franklin
  • Bryan Lloyd
Chapter
Part of the Community Quality-of-Life Indicators book series (CQLI, volume 3)

Abstract

As important as community indicators projects can be to a region’s health and prosperity, they do not come with built-in revenue streams. This chapter explores how operations can be sustained based on the model established in Twin Cities Compass, a regional project covering the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area in Minnesota, USA (population 2.8 million). The model consists of grant-funded “core” operations, supplemented by project-related contractual work. The case study presents budgetary information, discusses eight strategies used to develop and maintain an audience, provides examples of project-related contractual work, and closes with lessons learned while developing the model.

Keywords

Social Medium Advisory Group Contractual Work Community Indicator Twin City 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Craig Helmstetter
    • 1
    Email author
  • Paul Mattessich
    • 1
  • Andi Egbert
    • 1
  • Susan Brower
    • 1
  • Nancy Hartzler
    • 1
  • Jennifer Franklin
    • 1
  • Bryan Lloyd
    • 1
  1. 1.Wilder Research, Amherst H. Wilder FoundationSaint PaulUSA

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