Advertisement

Intensive Treatment of the Patient with Hepatic Trauma

  • B. Kremžar
  • A. Špec-Marn
Conference paper

Abstract

Injury to the liver is suspected in all patients with penetrating or blunt trauma that involves the lower chest and upper abdomen. Numerous analyses have shown that isolated liver injury with the exception of severe injury is relatively unimportant as a cause of death or serious complications. Results have demonstrated that the pattern of associated organ injuries is a major determinant of complications and of the ultimate outcome of patients with hepatic injuries. Severe blunt brain trauma is the most important associated injury seen in conjugation with blunt hepatic trauma [1].

Keywords

Enteral Nutrition Hepatic Blood Flow Liver Trauma Gastric Mucosa Blood Flow Hepatic Trauma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Rivkind A, Siegel JH, Dunhum CM (1989) Patterns of organ injury in blunt hepatic trauma and their significance for management and outcome. J Trauma 29: 1398–1415PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Scott CM, Grasbergerer RC, Heerao TF et al (1988) Intraabdominal sepsis after hepatic trauma. Am J Surg 155: 284–288PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ramsay G, Runcie C (1989) Hepatic dysfunction in shock. In: Vincent JL (ed) Update in intensive care and emergency medicine. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York, pp 386–375Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Colletti LM, Kunkel SL, Walz A et al (1996) The role of cytokine networks in the local liver injury following hepatic ischemia/reperfusion in the rat. Hepatology 23: 506–514PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Koeppel TA, Lehmann TG, Thies JC et al (1996) Impact of N-acetylcysteine on the hepatic microcirculation after orthotopic liver transplantation. Transplantation 61: 1397–1407PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Fukuzawa K, Emre S, Senyuz O et al (1995) N-acetylcysteine ameliorates reperfusion injury after warm hepatic ischemia. Transplantation 59: 6–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Schiano TD, Ehrenpreis ED (1998) Gut and hepatobiliary dysfunction. In: Hall JB, Schmidt GA, Wood LDH (eds) Principles of critical care. Mc Graw-Hill, New York, pp 1223–1236Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Gattinoni L, Brazzi L, Pelosi P (1996) Does cardiovascular optimization reduce mortality. In: Vincent JL (ed) Yearbook of intensive care and emergency medicine. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York, pp 308–318CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Dahn MS, Lange MP, Jacobs LA (1988) Central mixed and splanchnic venous oxygen saturation monitoring. Intensive Care Med 14: 373–378PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Dahn MS, Lange MP, Benn S (1999) The influence of hepatic venous oxygen saturation on the liver’s synthetic response to metabolic stress. Proc Soc Exp Biol 221: 39–45PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Kaku N (1987) Short-term and long-term changes with blunt liver injury. J Trauma 27: 607–614PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Martini C, Viviand X, Potie F (1997) Use and misuse of catecholamines: combination in septic shock patients. In: Vincent JL (ed) Yearbook of intensive care and emergency medicine. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York, pp 289–304Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Hawker F (1993) Liver trauma. In: Park GR (ed) Critical care management. WB Saunders, London, pp 356–371Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Zaloga GP, Roberts PR (1997) Early enteral feeding improves outcome. In: Vincent JL (ed) Yearbook of intensive care and emergency medicine. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York, pp 701–714Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Jolliet P, Pichard C, Biolo G et al (1999) Enteral nutrition in intensive care patients: a practical approach. Clin Nutr 18 (1): 47–56PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Kremžar
  • A. Špec-Marn

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations