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Anaesthetic Management of Obstetric Emergencies

  • G. Lyons
Conference paper

Abstract

The most common procedure in obstetrics requiring anaesthesia is caesarean section.

Keywords

Spinal Anaesthesia Maternal Death Postpartum Haemorrhage Uterine Rupture Emergency Caesarean Section 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Lyons

There are no affiliations available

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