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Role of Interventional Radiology

  • Francesco Colucci
  • Paolo Agresti
  • Stefano Pieri
  • Maurizio Morucci
  • Lorenzo de’ Medici
Part of the Updates in Surgery book series (UPDATESSURG)

Abstract

Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic condition in which patients often require multiple surgical procedures during their lifetime. Specifically, approximately 70–90% of patients with CD require surgery, and 33–82% undergo a second operation during the course of the disease [1]. Up to 33% may require more than two bowel resections. The results of percutaneous abscess drainage (PAD) must be viewed within this context, with the goal of minimizing the invasiveness of interventions equally as important as minimizing the number of interventions. Abdominal or pelvic abscesses occur in 10–28% of patients with CD during their lifetimes [2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. The mechanisms of abscess formation in these patients include peritoneal contamination at the time of previous surgery, remote hematologic seeding from diseased bowel, and direct extension from involved bowel. The latter is the most common mechanism, reflecting the transmural nature of the disease process, with deep, fissuring ulceration that may result in perforation of the bowel wall.

Keywords

Liver Abscess Percutaneous Drainage Pelvic Abscess Abscess Drainage Pyogenic Liver Abscess 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Italia 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francesco Colucci
    • 1
  • Paolo Agresti
    • 1
  • Stefano Pieri
    • 1
  • Maurizio Morucci
    • 1
  • Lorenzo de’ Medici
    • 1
  1. 1.Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of RadiologySan Camillo-Forlanini HospitalRomeItaly

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