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Evaluation of Nutritional State in Individuals that Practice Fitness

  • Angelo Pietrobelli
  • Manfredo Dugoni
  • Marco Poli
  • Marcella Malavolti
  • Nino C. Battistini

Abstract

The nutritional assessment is a challenge that is best accomplished by having medical-, nutritional-, exercise- and sports-oriented professionals working together. It is also a key to determining the health and performance efficiency of individuals that practice sports [1].

Keywords

Body Composition Eating Disorder Total Body Water Nutritional Assessment Cholesterol Ester Transfer Protein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angelo Pietrobelli
  • Manfredo Dugoni
  • Marco Poli
  • Marcella Malavolti
  • Nino C. Battistini

There are no affiliations available

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