Advertisement

Social Entrepreneurs and their Personality

  • Kati Ernst
Chapter

Zusammenfassung

Learning goals

Upon completing this chapter, you should be able to accomplish the following:
  • Understand the role of personality in entrepreneurship studies.

  • Describe the current knowledge on the personality in social entrepreneurs.

  • Name and explain the core elements of the entrepreneurial, and the prosocial personality of a social entrepreneur.

Keywords

Social Responsibility Entrepreneurial Activity Social Enterprise Social Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurial Intention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Further Reading

  1. [1]
    Bornstein, D. (2004), How to change the world: Social entrepreneurs and the power of new ideas, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Elkington, J. and Hartigan, P. (2008). The power of unreasonable people – How social entrepreneurs create markets that change the world, Harvard Business School Press, Boston.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    Hemingway, C. A. (2005), “Personal values as a catalyst for corporate social entrepreneurship”, in Journal of Business Ethics, vol. 60, no. 3, pp. 233–249.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. [4]
    Mair, J., Robinson, J.A. and Hockerts, K. (eds.), Social Entrepreneurship, Palgrave Macmillan, New York.Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    Rauch, A. and Frese, M. (2007), “Let’s put the person back into entrepreneurship research: a metaanalysis on the relationship between business owners’ personality traits, business creation, and success”, in European Journal of Work & Organizational Psychology, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 353–385.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Bibliography

  1. [1]
    Achleitner, A.-K., Heister, P. and Stahl, E. (2007), “Social Entrepreneurship – Ein Überblick”, in Achleitner, A.-K., Pöllath, R. and Stahl, E. (eds.), Finanzierung von Sozialunternehmern – Konzepte zur finanziellen Unterstützung von Social Entrepreneurs, Schäffer-Poeschel, Stuttgart, pp. 1–25.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Ajzen, I. (1991), “The theory of planned behavior”, in Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, vol. 50, no. 2, pp. 179–211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. [3]
    Barendsen, L., and Gardner, H. (2004), “Is the social entrepreneur a new type of leader?”, in Leader to Leader, 2004(34), pp. 43–50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. [4]
    Baum, J.R., and Locke, E.A. (2004), “The relationship of entrepreneurial traits, skill, and motivation to subsequent venture growth”, in Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 89, no. 4, pp. 587–598.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. [5]
    Bhawe, N., Jain, T.K., and Gupta, V.K. (2007), The entrepreneurship of the good samaritan: a qualitative study to understand how opportunities are perceived in social entrepreneurship. Paper presented at the BCERC.Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    Bierhoff, H.-W. (2010), Psychologie prosozialen Verhaltens – Warum wir anderen helfen, W. Kohlhammer, Stuttgart.Google Scholar
  7. [7]
    Bönte, W. and Jarosch, M. (2010), Mirror, mirror on the wall, who is the most entrepreneurial of them all? [Schumpeter Discussion Papers – 2010-009]. University of Wuppertal, Schumpeter School of Business and Economics, Wuppertal.Google Scholar
  8. [8]
    Bornstein, D. (2004), How to change the world: Social entrepreneurs and the power of new ideas, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.Google Scholar
  9. [9]
    Brockhaus, R.H., Sr. (1980), “Risk taking propensity of entrepreneurs”, in The Academy of Management Journal, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 509–520.Google Scholar
  10. [10]
    Collins, C.J., Hanges, P.J. and Locke, E.A. (2004), “The relationship of achievement motivation to entrepreneurial behavior: a meta-analysis”, in Human Performance, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 95–117.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. [11]
    Cromie, S. (2000), “Assessing entrepreneurial inclinations: some approaches and empirical evidence”, in European Journal of Work & Organizational Psychology, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 7–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. [12]
    Davis, M.H., Mitchell, K.V., Hall, J.A., Lothert, J., Snapp, T. and Meyer, M. (1999), “Empathy, expectations, and situational preferences: personality influences on the decision to participate in volunteer helping behaviors”, in Journal of Personality, vol. 67, no. 3, pp. 469–503.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. [13]
    Dees, J.G. (1998), The meaning of “social entrepreneurship”, Retrieved March 31, 2009, from http://www.fntc.info/files/documents/The%20meaning%20of%20Social%20Entreneurship.pdf.
  14. [14]
    Drayton, W. (2002), “The citizen sector: becoming as entrepreneurial and competitive as business”, in California Management Review, vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 120–132.Google Scholar
  15. [15]
    Eisenberg, N., Guthrie, I.K., Cumberland, A., Murphy, B.C., Shepard, S.A., Zhao, Q., et al. (2002), “Prosocial development in early adulthood: A longitudal study”, in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 82, no. 6, pp. 993–1006.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. [16]
    Elkington, J. and Hartigan, P. (2008), The power of unreasonable people – How social entrepreneurs create markets that change the world. Harvard Business School Press, Boston.Google Scholar
  17. [17]
    Frances, N. (2008), The end of charity: time for social enterprise, Allen & Unwin, Crows Nest.Google Scholar
  18. [18]
    Guclu, A., Dees, J.G. and Anderson, B.B. (2002), The process of social entrepreneurship: creating opportunities worthy of serious pursuit. Retrieved June 8, 2009, from http://www.caseatduke.org/documents/seprocess.pdf.
  19. [19]
    Harding, R. (2006), Social Entrepreneurship Monitor, Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM), London.Google Scholar
  20. [20]
    Hemingway, C.A. (2005), “Personal values as a catalyst for corporate social entrepreneurship” in Journal of Business Ethics, vol. 60, no. 3, pp. 233–249.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. [21]
    Hustinx, L., Handy, F., Cnaan, R.A., Brudney, J.L., Pessi, A.B. and Yamauchi, N. (2010), “Social and cultural origins of motivations to volunteer: a comparison of university students in six countries”, in International Sociology, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 349–382.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. [22]
    Johnson, B.R. (1990), “Toward a multidimensional model of entrepreneurship: the case of achievement motivation and the entrepreneur”, in Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 39–54.Google Scholar
  23. [23]
    Leadbeater, C. (1997), The rise of the social entrepreneur, Demos, London.Google Scholar
  24. [24]
    Light, P. C. (2011), Driving social change – How to solve the world’s toughest problems, Wiley, Hoboken.Google Scholar
  25. [25]
    Mair, J. and Noboa, E. (2006), “Social entrepreneurship: how intentions to create a social enterprise get formed”, in Mair, J., Robinson, J.A. and Hockerts, K. (eds.), Social Entrepreneurship, Palgrave Macmillan, New York, pp. 121–135.Google Scholar
  26. [26]
    Martin, R.L. and Osberg, S. (2007), “Social entrepreneurship: the case for definition”, in Stanford Social Innovation Review, (Spring), pp. 28–39.Google Scholar
  27. [27]
    Meehan, B. (2004), “15 minutes – Bill Drayton”, in Stanford Social Innovation Review, (Spring), pp. 11–12.Google Scholar
  28. [28]
    Mort, G.S., Weerawardena, J. and Carnegie, K. (2003), “Social entrepreneurship: towards conceptualisation”, in International Journal of Nonprofit & Voluntary Sector Marketing, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 76–88.Google Scholar
  29. [29]
    Penner, L.A. and Finkelstein, M.A. (1998), “Dispositional and structural determinants of volunteerism”, in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 74, pp. 525–537.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. [30]
    Penner, L.A., Dovidio, J.F., Piliavin, J.A. and Schroeder, D.A. (2005), “Prosocial behavior: multilevel perspectives”, in Annual Review of Psychology, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 365–392.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. [31]
    Peredo, A.M. and McLean, M. (2006), “Social entrepreneurship: a critical review of the concept”, in Journal of World Business, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 56–65.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. [32]
    Perrini, F. and Vurro, C. (2006), “Social entrepreneurship: innovation and social change across theory and practice”, in Mair, J., Robinson J.A. and Hockerts, K. (eds.), Social entrepreneurship, Palgrave Macmillan, New York, pp. 57–85.Google Scholar
  33. [33]
    Rauch, A. and Frese, M. (2007), “Let’s put the person back into entrepreneurship research: a metaanalysis on the relationship between business owners’ personality traits, business creation, and success”, in European Journal of Work & Organizational Psychology, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 353–385.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. [34]
    Seanor, P. and Meaton, J. (2007), “Making sense of social enterprise”, in Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 90–100.Google Scholar
  35. [35]
    Simms, S.V. K. and Robinson, J.A. (2005), Activist or entrepreneur? An identity-based model of social entrepreneurship. Paper presented at the USASBE 2006 Conference.Google Scholar
  36. [36]
    Spear, R. (2006), “Social entrepreneurship: a different model?”, in International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 33, no. 5/6, pp. 399–410.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. [37]
    Thompson, J., Alvy, G. and Lees, A. (2000), “Social entrepreneurship – A new look at the people and the potential”, in Management Decision, vol. 38, no. 5, pp. 328–338.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. [38]
    Winkler, A. (2008), “Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschiede zwischen Social Entrepreneurs und Business Entrepreneurs”, in Braun, G. and French, M (eds.), Social Entrepreneurship – Unternehmerische Ideen für eine bessere Gesellschaft, HIE-RO Institut, Universität Rostock, Rostock. pp. 95–119Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Gabler Verlag | Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kati Ernst
    • 1
  1. 1.Schumpeter School of Business and EconomicsUniversity of WuppertalWuppertalGermany

Personalised recommendations