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Social Entrepreneurship: Definitions, Drivers and Challenges

  • Benjamin Huybrechts
  • Alex Nicholls
Chapter

Zusammenfassung

Learning goals

Upon completing this chapter, you should be able to accomplish the following:
  • Explain the three pillars of social entrepreneurship.

  • Explain how social entrepreneurship can be differentiated from other related concepts such as the third sector (or the social economy), social business, social innovation and corporate social responsibility.

  • List and describe some of the drivers of social responsibility and apply/adapt them to your own context.

  • Explain why measuring social entrepreneurship is difficult; provide some figures/ evidence from initiatives you know of.

  • Identify and characterize socially entrepreneurial initiatives in terms of definitions, drivers, size and key challenges.

Keywords

Corporate Social Responsibility Civil Society Fair Trade Market Orientation Social Enterprise 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. [1]
    Austin, J., Stevenson, H. and Wei-Skillern, J. (2006b), "Social and Commercial Entrepreneurship: Same, Different, or Both?", in Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 1–22 .CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. [2]
    Bacq, S. and Janssen, F. (2011), "The multiple faces of social entrepreneurship: A review of definitional issues based on geographical and thematic criteria", in Entrepreneurship & Regional Development: An International Journal, vol 23, no. 5, pp. 373 – 403CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. [3]
    Dacin, P.A., Dacin, M.T. and Matear, M. (2010), "Social Entrepreneurship: Why We Don’t Need a New Theory and How We Move Forward From Here", in Academy of Management Perspectives, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 37–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Dees, J.G. (2001), The Meaning ofSocial Entrepreneurship”, The Fuqua School of Business, Duke University.Google Scholar
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    Mair, J. and Marti, I. (2006), "Social entrepreneurship research: A source of explanation, prediction, and delight", in Journal of World Business, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 36–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. [6]
    Martin, R.L. and Osberg, S. (2007), "Social Entrepreneurship: The Case for Definition", in Stanford Social Innovation Review, Spring 2007, pp. 29–39.Google Scholar
  7. [7]
    Mort, G.S., Weerawardena, J. and Carnegie, K. (2003), "Social entrepreneurship: Towards conceptualisation", in International Journal of Nonprofit & Voluntary Sector Marketing, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 76.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. [8]
    Nicholls, A. (2010c), "The Legitimacy of Social Entrepreneurship: Reflexive Isomorphism in a Pre- Paradigmatic Field", in Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 611–633.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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Copyright information

© Gabler Verlag | Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin Huybrechts
    • 1
  • Alex Nicholls
    • 2
  1. 1.HEC Management School Centre for Social EconomyUniversity of LiegeLiegeGermany
  2. 2.Saïd Business School Skoll Centre for Social EntrepreneurshipUniversity of OxfordOxfordGermany

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