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Overview Over the Historical Development

Part of the Contributions to Economics book series (CE)

Abstract

To start with the very beginning, today’s corporations have their origins in century-old institutions which were founded for colonial purposes and put in charge for the management and execution of public projects — the foundation and existence of those early corporations remained a privilege granted by the state at first, and therefore, staid within its discretionary power alone. One might say, at this point, corporations were highly “socially responsible”, as they were acting on behalf of public interests exclusively (although this was not a choice they had made).1

Keywords

Corporate Social Responsibility Social Responsibility Corporate Governance Socially Responsible Investment Corporate Responsibility 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Physica-Verlag Heidelberg 2008

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