Advertisement

Platinum, Palladium and Rhodium in a Bavarian Roadside Soil

  • Edzard HangenEmail author
  • Thomas Dörr
Chapter
Part of the Environmental Science and Engineering book series (ESE)

Abstract

As constituents of automobile exhaust catalysts platinum, palladium and rhodium are emitted by mechanical abrasion. Their deposition and vertical displacement in the soil was investigated along an east-west oriented transect at the Franken expressway (highway 73), Germany. With increasing distance to the road the concentrations of platinum, palladium and rhodium decreased exponentially. The influence of wind effects as well as of guard rails upon the lateral distribution of the three elements was clearly reflected. In view of a rising traffic density the pollution by platinum, palladium and rhodium becomes more important.

Keywords

Platinum Palladium Rhodium Roadside soils Bavaria 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was financed by the Bavarian State Ministry of the Environment and Public Health. We thank the Highway Maintenance Agency Erlangen for support in selecting optimal sampling points and for safeguarding during sampling activities.

References

  1. Abougalma H (2004) Uptake, translocation, accumulation, and phytotoxicity of platinum group elements (PGE) on potato, lettuce, and barley. Dissertation, Karlsruhe University, 176 ppGoogle Scholar
  2. Dikikh Y (2006) Adsorption und Mobilisierung wasserlöslicher Kfz-emittierter Platingruppenelemente (Pt, Rh, Pd) and verschiedenen bodentypischen Mineralen. Karlsruher Mineralogische und Geochemische Hefte 31, 125 ppGoogle Scholar
  3. Eckhardt JD, Schäfer J (1997) PGE-Emissionen aus Kfz-Abgaskatalysatoren. In: Matschullat J, Tobschall HJ, Voigt HJ (eds) Geochemie und Umwelt: Relevante Prozesse in Atmo-, Pedo- und Hydrosphäre. Springer, Berlin, pp 181–188CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Fritsche J, Meisel T (2004) Determination of anthropogenic input of Ru, Rh, Pd, Re, Os, Ir and Pt in soils along Austrian motorways by isotope dilution ICP-MS. Sci Total Environ 325:145–154CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Gao B, Yu Y, Zhou H, Lu J (2012) Accumulation and distribution characteristics of platinum group elements in roadside dusts in Beijing, China. Environ Toxicol Chem 31:1231–1238CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Hangen E, Dörr T (2010) Platin, Palladium und Rhodium in straßennahen Böden Bayerns. 6. Marktredwitzer Bodenschutztage, Municipality of Marktredwitz (ed), pp 161–166Google Scholar
  7. Hornung RW, Reed LD (1990) Estimation of average concentration in the presence of nondetectable values. Appl Occup Environ Hyg 5:46–51CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Mihaljevič M, Galušková I, Strnad L, Majer V (2013) Distribution of platinum group elements in urban soils, comparison of historically different large cities Prague and Ostrava, Czech Republic. J Geochem Explor 124:212–217CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Morcelli CPR, Figueiredo AMG, Sarkis JES, Enzweiler J, Kakazu M, Sigolo JB (2005) PGEs and other traffic-related elements in roadside soils from Sao Paulo, Brazil. Sci Total Environ 345:81–91CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Puchelt H, Eckhardt JD, Schäfer J (1995) Einträge von Platingruppenelementen (PGE) aus Kfz-Abgaskatalysatoren in straßennahe Böden. Landesanstalt für Umweltschutz Baden-Württemberg (eds), 15 ppGoogle Scholar
  11. Rauch S, Morrison GM (2008) Environmental relevance of the platinum-group elements. Elements 4:259–263CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Shell Deutschland Oil GmbH (2009) Shell Pkw-Szenarien bis 2030, 54 ppGoogle Scholar
  13. Wang Y, Li X (2012) Health risk of platinum group elements from automobile catalysts. Procedia Eng 45:1004–1009CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Wichmann H, Anquandah GAK, Schmidt C, Zachmann D, Bahadir AM (2007) Increase of platinum group element concentrations in soils and airborne dust in an urban area in Germany. Sci Total Environ 388:121–127CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Zereini F, Skerstupp B, Alt F, Helmers E, Urban H (1997) Geochemical behaviour of platinum-group elements by automobile exhaust catalysts: experimental results and environmental investigations. Sci Total Environ 206:137–146CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Bavarian Environment AgencyHofGermany
  2. 2.Water Management Authority NurembergNurembergGermany

Personalised recommendations