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The synthesis and transformation of the oligosaccharides in plants, including their hydrolysis

  • W. Z. Hassid
Part of the Handbuch der Pflanzenphysiologie / Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology book series (532, volume 6)

Abstract

Of all the oligosaccharid.es sucrose is the most significant because of its wide distribution and its important metabolic role in plants. This disaccharide is not only a major photosynthetic product of higher plants but is also one of the principal forms of carbohydrate storage and accumulation. There is evidence indicating that carbohydrates are largely transported within the plant as sucrose.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag oHG. Berlin · Göttingen · Heidelberg 1958

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Z. Hassid

There are no affiliations available

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