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Increase of TNF-α Serum Levels in Major Transplant-Related Complications of Human Bone Marrow Transplantation— Association with Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease and Activation of Host Macrophages

  • E. Holler
  • H. J. Kolb
  • S. Liesenfeld
  • A. Möller
  • J. Kempeni
  • G. Chmel
  • W. Lehmacher
  • B. Gleixner
  • J. Mittermüller
  • C. Riedner
  • W. Wilmanns
Conference paper

Abstract

In human bone marrow transplantation (BMT) transplant-related mortality is a major problem even in low-risk patients (pts) and still occurs in about 25% to 35% of pts [1]. During the aplastic phase, endothelial leakage syndrome (ELS) and veno-occlusive disease (VOD) are the major transplant-related complications (TRC). After engraftment, infections, interstitial pneumonitis (IP), and acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD) are the main causes of death within the first 4 to 6 months following BMT [2–4].

Keywords

Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cytokine Release Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation Interstitial Pneumonitis Host Macrophage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Holler
  • H. J. Kolb
  • S. Liesenfeld
  • A. Möller
  • J. Kempeni
  • G. Chmel
  • W. Lehmacher
  • B. Gleixner
  • J. Mittermüller
  • C. Riedner
  • W. Wilmanns

There are no affiliations available

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