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Durchstrahlungsmikroskope

  • K. Kobayashi
  • E. Suito
  • S. Shimadzu
  • B. Tadano
  • S. Katagiri
  • K. Ichige
  • Y. Sakaki
  • S. Maruse
  • T. Hibi
  • S. Takahashi
  • A. C. van Dorsten
  • S. L. van den Broek
  • M. Gribi
  • M. Thürkauf
  • W. Villiger
  • L. Wegmann
  • Kazuhiko Akashi
  • Tatsunosuke Masuda
  • Hiroshi Tochigi
  • A. Strojnik
  • K. Müller
  • E. Ruska
  • G. A. Meek
  • W. D. Riecke

Abstract

A research electron microscope with an accelerating voltage up to 350 kV was developed. High tension is generated by means of step-up transformers, and fed to the three-stage accelerators through a coaxial cable which avoids exposing the highest tension. Thus the corona and leakage loss are minimized and the fluctuation of voltage is kept in the order of 10-5. The electron beam from the gun is adjusted by both static and magnetic deflectors. The intermediate and projector lenses are adjustable to the optical axis of the objective lens merely by moving their pole pieces. All lenses can be replaced or removed from the side without disassembling the microscope body. This microscope, thus designed, can be adapted to any electron diffraction studies. Even heat-sensitive organic specimens keep their original structures in this microscope, and it is possible to obtain distinct diffraction patterns from any selected area. Solid materials can be investigated more extensively; the transitions of crystals and phases are also easily followed by applying the heating or cooling devices. The most interesting application of this instrument is stereoscopy, that is, the three-dimensional observation of inner structures, which otherwise are attainable only by laborious observations of successive ultra thin sections.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag OHG. Berlin · Göttingen · Heidelberg 1960

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Kobayashi
    • 1
  • E. Suito
    • 1
  • S. Shimadzu
    • 1
  • B. Tadano
    • 2
    • 3
  • S. Katagiri
    • 2
    • 3
  • K. Ichige
    • 2
    • 3
  • Y. Sakaki
    • 2
    • 3
  • S. Maruse
    • 2
    • 3
  • T. Hibi
    • 4
  • S. Takahashi
    • 4
  • A. C. van Dorsten
    • 5
  • S. L. van den Broek
    • 5
  • M. Gribi
    • 6
    • 7
  • M. Thürkauf
    • 6
    • 7
  • W. Villiger
    • 6
    • 7
  • L. Wegmann
    • 6
    • 7
  • Kazuhiko Akashi
    • 8
  • Tatsunosuke Masuda
    • 8
  • Hiroshi Tochigi
    • 8
  • A. Strojnik
    • 9
  • K. Müller
    • 10
  • E. Ruska
    • 10
  • G. A. Meek
    • 11
  • W. D. Riecke
    • 10
  1. 1.Institute for Chem. Research, Central Research Laboratory, Shimadzu SeisakushoKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Hitachi Zentral-ForschungslaboratoriumTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Elektrotechnisches InstitutUniversität NagoyaJapan
  4. 4.Research Institute for Scientific MeasurementTohoku UniversitySendaiJapan
  5. 5.Philips Research Laboratories, Philips Phys. Techn. X-ray Lab.N. V. Philips GloeilampenfabriekenEindhovenNetherlands
  6. 6.Elektronenmikroskopisches LaboratoriumUniversität BaselDeutschland
  7. 7.Trüb, Täuber & Co. AG.ZürichDeutschland
  8. 8.Akashi Seisakusho, Ltd.TokyoJapan
  9. 9.ElektroinstitutUniversität LjubljanaJugoslawien
  10. 10.Institut für Elektronenmikroskopie am Fritz-Haber-InstitutMax-Planck-GesellschaftBerlin-DahlemDeutschland
  11. 11.Department of Human AnatomyUniversity of OxfordUK

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