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Pain pp 173-176 | Cite as

Electrodiagnostic Testing

  • Nathan J. RudinEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Electrodiagnostic testing (electromyography, nerve conduction studies, and other tests) is a valuable extension to the pain physician’s history and physical examination. It helps establish or confirm diagnoses and provides prognostic information. Electrodiagnostic techniques can also help localize targets for nerve blocks and other injections. This chapter summarizes electrodiagnostic techniques and their applications in pain medicine.

Keywords

Nerve conduction studies Electromyography Electrodiagnosis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Orthopedics and RehabilitationUniversity of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public HealthMadisonUSA

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