Anarthria and Verbal Short-Term Memory

  • R. Logie
  • R. Cubelli
  • S. Della Sala
  • M. Alberoni
  • P. Nichelli

Abstract

The nature of coding in verbal short-term memory has been a topic of some considerable debate. Much of the evidence for phonological coding in normal adults is based on the phonological similarity effect; the finding that sequences of items that are phonologically similar to one another are less well recalled than items that are phonologically dissimilar (Conrad, 1964).

Keywords

Word Length Visual Presentation Articulatory Suppression Phonological Code Phonological Similarity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Logie
  • R. Cubelli
  • S. Della Sala
  • M. Alberoni
  • P. Nichelli

There are no affiliations available

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