Controlled-Release and Localized Targeting of Interferons

  • Deborah A. Eppstein
  • Marjorie A. van der Pas
  • Brian B. Schryver
  • Philip L. Felgner
  • Carol A. Gloff
  • Kenneth F. Soike
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 125)

Abstract

Interferon’s (α and β), produced both by recombinant DNA technology as well as purified from natural sources, have been shown to be efficacious in treating certain cancers and viral diseases. Studies with γ-interferon have more recently been undertaken, and thus definition of their clinical utility is not yet as well defined. The treatment schedules usually involve multiple injections of the Interferon (IFN) over a period of several weeks to many months. Using such treatment regimens, the dose levels of the interferons needed to obtain efficacy can result in toxic side effects. For all these reasons, methods of increasing the ease of administration as well as the therapeutic ratio of interferons are warranted.

Keywords

Stratum Corneum Release Profile Varicella Zoster Virus Liposomal Formulation Hairy Cell Leukemia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deborah A. Eppstein
    • 1
  • Marjorie A. van der Pas
    • 1
  • Brian B. Schryver
    • 1
  • Philip L. Felgner
    • 1
  • Carol A. Gloff
    • 2
  • Kenneth F. Soike
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Bio-Organic ChemistrySyntex ResearchPalo AltoUSA
  2. 2.Triton Bio-Sciences, Inc.AlamedaUSA
  3. 3.Delta Regional Primate CenterTulane UniversityCovingtonUSA

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