The Role of N-Nitroso Compounds in Human Cancer

  • William Lijinsky

Abstract

Only a small proportion of human cancers appear to be caused by exposure to carcinogenic agents of known nature, for example radiation and industrial chemicals. For the remainder, it is probable that no single cause is prominent, but that combinations of many carcinogenic agents, probably mainly at low concentrations, are responsible. Apart from the use of tobacco, which seems to be related to several types of cancer, especially lung cancer, there are no reasonable explanations for the most common types of cancer, including stomach, liver (in the non-industrial world), colon, nervous system, breast, uterus and cervix, prostate and pancreas; esophagus and bladder cancer are also unknown in this regard, but they seem to be particularly common in certain locations and among certain groups.

Keywords

Rubber Factory Nasal Mucosa Tertiary Amine Smokeless Tobacco Carcinogenic Agent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Lijinsky
    • 1
  1. 1.NCI-Frederick Cancer Research FacilityBRI-Basic Research ProgramFrederickUSA

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