Progress in Cryocoolers

  • Ray Radebaugh
Part of the Applications of Cryogenic Technology book series (APCT, volume 10)

Abstract

A significant number of advances have been made during the last few years in a variety of cryocoolers. This paper discusses some of these advances in Brayton, Joule-Thomson, Stirling, pulse tube, Gifford-McMahon, and magnetic refrigerators. Reliability has been a major driving force for new research areas. This paper reviews various approaches taken in the last few years to improve cryocooler reliability. The advantages and disadvantages of different cycles are compared, and the latest improvements in each of these cryocoolers is discussed.

Keywords

Pulse Tube Gadolinium Gallium Garnet Brayton Cycle Pulse Tube Refrigerator Expansion Turbine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ray Radebaugh
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of Standards and TechnologyBoulderUSA

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