Nephrotoxicity pp 519-526 | Cite as

Pathogenesis of Protein Droplet Nephropathy and Its Relationship to Renal Carcinogenesis in the Male Rat

  • Brian G. Short
  • Vicki L. Burnett
  • James A. Swenberg

Abstract

Male rats chronically exposed to inhaled unleaded gasoline (UG) or other petroleum hydrocarbon fuels developed a low but dose-related increase in the incidence of renal adenomas and carcinomas (3,10). Elucidation of the mechanism of this sex and species-specific carcinogenic response to UG is essential for determining the potential human health risk from exposure to UG. Genotoxic assays of UG, including a recently developed in vivo/in vitro unscheduled DNA synthesis assay for the kidney, have been predominately negative (5,13,14,18).

Keywords

Proximal Tubule Labelling Index Petroleum Hydrocarbon Lower Dose Group Outer Medulla 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian G. Short
    • 1
  • Vicki L. Burnett
    • 1
  • James A. Swenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Chemical Industry Institute of ToxicologyResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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