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Sub-PPM Nitrogen Dioxide Conductometric Response at Room Temperature by Graphene Flakes Based Layer

  • Mara Miglietta
  • Tiziana Polichetti
  • Ettore Massera
  • Ivana Nasti
  • Filiberto Ricciardella
  • Silvia Romano
  • Girolamo Di Francia
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 109)

Abstract

The two-dimensional nature of graphene, allowing a total exposure of all its atoms to the adsorbing gas molecules, provides the greatest sensor area per unit volume and outlines the possibility to employ this material as a powerful sensing layer. The synthesis and manipulation of graphene as well as the device fabrication are still challenging due to several technological limits. In the present work we report on a simple approach to fabricate chemiresistive sensors based on chemically exfoliated natural graphite. The devices show the ability to detect a toxic gas, such as NO2, down to few ppb at room temperature in controlled environments.

Keywords

Reduce Graphene Oxide Nitrogen Dioxide Graphene Film Graphene Flake Reduce Graphene Oxide Sheet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors want to acknowledge Dr. Gennaro Gentile for the TEM measurements. This research was supported by EU within the framework of the project ENCOMB (grant no. 266226).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mara Miglietta
    • 1
  • Tiziana Polichetti
    • 1
  • Ettore Massera
    • 1
  • Ivana Nasti
    • 1
  • Filiberto Ricciardella
    • 1
  • Silvia Romano
    • 1
  • Girolamo Di Francia
    • 1
  1. 1.ENEA Centro Ricerche PorticiPorticiItaly

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