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Integer Motion Estimation

  • Youn-Long Steve Lin
  • Chao-Yang Kao
  • Huang-Chih Kuo
  • Jian-Wen Chen
Chapter

Abstract

Interframe prediction in H.264/AVC is carried out in three phases: integer motion estimation (IME), fractional motion estimation, and motion compensation. We will discuss these functions in this chapter and Chaps.4 and 5, respectively. Because motion estimation in H.264/AVC supports variable block sizes and multiple reference frames, high computational complexity and huge data traffic become main difficulties in VLSI implementation. Moreover, high-resolution video applications, such as HDTV, make these problems more critical. Therefore, current VLSI designs usually adopt parallel architecture to increase the total throughput and solve high computational complexity. On the other hand, many data-reuse schemes try to increase data-reuse ratio and, hence, reduce required data traffic. In this chapter, we will introduce several key points of VLSI implementation for IME.

Keywords

Search Window Search Point Block Match Reference Block Multiple Reference Frame 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Youn-Long Steve Lin
    • 1
  • Chao-Yang Kao
    • 1
  • Huang-Chih Kuo
    • 1
  • Jian-Wen Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. Computer ScienceNational Tsing Hua UniversityHsinChuTaiwan R.O.C.

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