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Hispanics and Higher Education: An Overview of Research, Theory, and Practice

  • Amaury Nora
  • Gloria Crisp
Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 24)

Abstract

Substantial gaps exist in our knowledge base relative to understanding and serving the unique needs of Latina/Latino students in all areas of postsecondary education. More specifically, a deeper understanding of the issues surrounding both access and persistence of Hispanic students is needed. As such, the present article reviews and synthesizes the literature relative to the barriers and limitations impacting college access and choice. Next, the article reviews existing literature and theory specific to the impact of academic, social, noncognitive, perceptual, and behavior factors impacting Hispanic students’ persistence decisions. An overview of state and federal policy impacting Hispanic college students is then provided in preface to best practices and policy recommendations for serving Hispanic students throughout the educational pipeline.

Keywords

Community College Minority Student White Student Hispanic Student Latino Student 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amaury Nora
    • 1
  • Gloria Crisp
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Hispanic Student SuccessUniversity of Houston’s College of EducationUSA
  2. 2.Higher Education in the Educational Leadership & Policy Studies DepartmentUniversity of TexasSan AntonioUSA

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