Enter the Dragon? China's Higher Education Returns to the World Community: The Case of the Peking University Personnel Reforms

  • Rui Yang
Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 24)

Abstract

Peking University has been urged to achieve world-class level in the coming decade. The university issued a plan to reform its faculty appointment and promotion systems in 2004. The plan received strong responses and was hotly debated. The debate touched on the fundamental issue: successful adaptation of the European–American education system to China has not been matched with continuity with the traditional Chinese spirit of higher learning. After reviewing the historical achievements of Peking University, using the event as an indicative case, and locating Peking University’s contemporary reforms in historical and international contexts with due regard for cultural and social issues, the chapter captures China’s experience as its higher education institutions reenter the world community.

Keywords

Europe Income Hunt Rosen Defend 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rui Yang
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of EducationUniversity of Hong KongHong Kong

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