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Assessment and Evaluation in Problem-based Learning

  • Di Marks-Maran
  • B. Gail Thomas
Part of the Nurse Education in Practice book series (NEP)

Abstract

This chapter will explore two issues that are fundamental to PBL programmes: assessing and evaluating PBL. Because the terms ‘assessment’ and ‘evaluation’ mean different things to different people, we will begin by offering our definitions of these two educational terms. When we speak of assessment, we are referring to knowing that our students have learned. Assessment measures the learning impact on the individual student. Evaluation on the other hand, is about the overall quality and value of the programme from the perspective of all the stakeholders. The two concepts are inextricably linked but will be examined separately in this chapter.

Keywords

Problem Base Learn Academic Medicine Medical Teacher Midwifery Education Problem Base Learn Curriculum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Di Marks-Maran and B. Gail Thomas 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Di Marks-Maran
  • B. Gail Thomas

There are no affiliations available

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