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Genophone: Evolving Sounds and Integral Performance Parameter Mappings

  • James Mandelis
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2611)

Abstract

This project explores the application of evolutionary techniques to the design of novel sounds and their characteristics during performance. It is based on the “selective breeding” paradigm and as such dispensing with the need for detailed knowledge of the Sound Synthesis Techniques involved, in order to design sounds that are novel and of musical interest. This approach has been used successfully on several SSTs therefore validating it as an Adaptive Sound Meta-synthesis Technique. Additionally, mappings between the control and the parametric space are evolved as part of the sound setup. These mappings are used during performance.

Keywords

Selective Breeding Variable Mutation Finger Flex Recombination Operator Sound Change 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Mandelis
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Cognitive and Computing SciencesUniversity of SussexUK

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