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Regional Research of Russia

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 174–178 | Cite as

Between a dacha and a fashionable residence. The Western idea

  • I. Brade
Urban and Rural Geography
  • 40 Downloads

Abstract

This paper analyzes the phenomenon of the Russian “dacha” through the lens of Western European research. This phenomenon is studied in the context of finding the strategies of dacha residents with historical hindsight and the value of dachas in the Soviet and post-Soviet societies. Special attention is paid to social aspects of the lives of dacha residents in the suburbs in post-Soviet Russia.

Keywords

dacha gardening cooperative residential pattern urbanized territory 

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Leibniz Institute for Regional GeographyLeipzigGermany

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