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Russian Journal of Pacific Geology

, Volume 2, Issue 6, pp 512–520 | Cite as

Chemical and isotopic (18O/16O and D/1H) composition of groundwaters of central and southern Primorye

  • V. A. Chudaeva
  • O. V. Chudaev
  • S. G. Yurchenko
Article

Abstract

Groundwaters of Primorye, including its coastal areas, were studied during the past ten years. The macro-and microelement composition of more than 130 samples showed that shallow groundwaters of southern Primorye with pH ranging between 5.4 and 8.4 contain oxygen (up to 10 mg/l) and typically have a mixed ionic composition. The microelement variations reflect both the natural features of the host rocks and possible anthropogenic pollution in the most populated areas. No seawater intrusions were recognized in the study areas, which is confirmed by the chemical composition of the waters, the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition of the groundwaters, the atmospheric precipitation, and the coastal seawaters of Primorye. In spite of the variations of individual components, the quality of the groundwaters used for potable purposes is rather satisfactory as compared to the Russian and the World Health Organization standards. At the same time, taking into account the increase of various microelements and biogenic components in the waters, the monitoring and control of the water composition is strongly recommended to preserve their potable quality.

Key words

groundwaters microelements chemical composition stable isotopes Primorye 

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Copyright information

© MAIK Nauka 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. A. Chudaeva
    • 1
  • O. V. Chudaev
    • 2
  • S. G. Yurchenko
    • 1
  1. 1.Pacific Institute of Geography, Far East BranchRussian Academy of SciencesVladivostokRussia
  2. 2.Far East Geological Institute, Far East BranchRussian Academy of SciencesVladivostokRussia

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