Journal of Computing in Higher Education

, Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 176–186 | Cite as

Beyond teaching instructional design models: exploring the design process to advance professional development and expertise

Article

Abstract

Instructional Design literature provides descriptions of established models that are particularly helpful for novices learning the patterns and approaches that have historically proven successful. However, it does not provide as much information about the design process in its largest sense. The popularity of established ID models may cause instructional designers to limit their approaches and isolate themselves from alternate views of design. The authors present a synthesis of the literature of design in general with specific approaches cited in fields including architecture, the automotive industry, engineering, fashion, the performing arts, as well as instructional design, and conclude with a discussion of what ID might adopt and adapt from other design disciplines to foster professional development and expertise.

Keywords

Instructional design Instructional systems design Instructional technology Educational technology 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mathematics, Science and Instructional Technology EducationEast Carolina UniversityGreenvilleUSA
  2. 2.California State UniversityFullertonUSA

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