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Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 33, Issue 6, pp 795–796 | Cite as

Tracking Steps on Apple Watch at Different Walking Speeds

  • Praveen Veerabhadrappa
  • Matthew Duffy Moran
  • Mitchell D. Renninger
  • Matthew B. Rhudy
  • Scott B. Dreisbach
  • Kristin M. Gift
Concise Research Reports

Key Points

Question

How accurate are the step counts obtained from Apple Watch?

Findings

In this validation study, video steps vs. Apple Watch steps (mean ± SD) were 2965 ± 144 vs. 2964 ± 145 steps; P < 0.001. Lin’s concordance correlation coefficient showed a strong correlation (r = 0.96; P < 0.001) between the two measurements. There was a total error of 0.034% (1.07 steps) for the Apple Watch steps when compared with the manual counts obtained from video recordings.

Meaning

Our study is one of the initial studies to objectively validate the accuracy of the step counts obtained from Apple watch at different walking speeds. Apple Watch tested to be an extremely accurate device for measuring daily step counts for adults.

KEY WORDS

Apple watch step counts tracking 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank our study participants, Mr. Michael Briggs for statistical guidance, and Ms. Filomena Kilar for research assistance.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they do not have a conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Praveen Veerabhadrappa
    • 1
  • Matthew Duffy Moran
    • 1
  • Mitchell D. Renninger
    • 1
  • Matthew B. Rhudy
    • 2
  • Scott B. Dreisbach
    • 1
  • Kristin M. Gift
    • 1
  1. 1.Kinesiology, Division of ScienceThe Pennsylvania State UniversityReadingUSA
  2. 2.Engineering, Division of Engineering, Business and ComputingThe Pennsylvania State UniversityReadingUSA

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