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Natural Computing

, Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 311–321 | Cite as

On Cellular Automata rules of molecular arrays

  • Satyajit Sahu
  • Hiroshi Oono
  • Subrata Ghosh
  • Anirban Bandyopadhyay
  • Daisuke Fujita
  • Ferdinand Peper
  • Teijiro Isokawa
  • Ranjit Pati
Article

Abstract

Cellular Automata (CA) have long attracted interest as abstract computation models, but only in the last few years have serious attempts started to implement them in terms of molecules. Such nano-technological innovations promise very cost-effective fabrication because of the regular structure of CA, which allows assembly through molecular self-organization. The small sizes of molecules combined with their availability in Avogadro-scale numbers promises a huge computational power, in which the massive parallelism inherent in CA can be effectively exploited. This paper discusses the molecular CA in (Bandyopadhyay et al., Nature Physics 2010) and shows novel features that have never been proposed in conventional CA models. The interaction rules in the molecular CA are found to be of a mixed variety, ranging from conventional direct-neighborhood type of rules to rules with long-distance interactions between cells. The probabilities according to which rules are applied in the molecular CA are dynamically influenced by the patterns on the cellular space. This results in extremely rich behavior, as compared to conventional models, which has the potential to be utilized for efficient configuration of patterns on the cellular space.

Keywords

Cellular Automata Molecular electronics Reconfigurability Molecular networks 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Authors acknowledge JSPS Grants in Aid for Young Scientists (A) for 2009-2011, Grant number 21681015 (Govt. of Japan). R.P. acknowledges National Science Foundation (NSF) Award number ECCS-0643420.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Satyajit Sahu
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Oono
    • 2
  • Subrata Ghosh
    • 1
  • Anirban Bandyopadhyay
    • 1
  • Daisuke Fujita
    • 1
  • Ferdinand Peper
    • 3
  • Teijiro Isokawa
    • 2
  • Ranjit Pati
    • 4
  1. 1.Advanced Nano Characterization CenterNational Institute for Materials ScienceTsukubaJapan
  2. 2.Division of Computer EngineeringUniversity of HyogoHimejiJapan
  3. 3.Brain ICT LaboratoryNational Institute of Information and Communications TechnologyKobeJapan
  4. 4.Department of PhysicsMichigan Technological UniversityHoughtonUSA

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