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Metascience

, Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 301–304 | Cite as

Rethinking the scope of experimental philosophy

Eugen Fischer and John Collins (eds.): Experimental philosophy, rationalism, and naturalism: rethinking philosophical method. London: Routledge, 2015, 302pp, $54.95 PB, $155.00 HB
  • Justin Sytsma
Book Review

Eugen Fischer and John Collins have brought together an impressive, and important, series of essays concerning the methodological debates between rationalists and naturalists, and how these debates have been impacted by work in experimental philosophy. The work at issue concerns the evidential value of intuitions, and as such is only a small part of the experimental philosophy corpus as I understand it. In fact, Fischer and Collins define experimental philosophy in this narrow sense in their introduction. On their view, experimental philosophy “builds on the assumption that, for better or worse, intuitions are crucially involved in philosophical work” (3). The parenthetical serves to emphasize that such work could either be pursued from a positive perspective aiming to vindicate the use of intuitions in philosophy or from a negativeperspective aiming to undermine that use. Noting these two perspectives, it might then seem that experimental philosophy is neutral with regard to...

References

  1. Buckwalter, Wesley, and Justin Sytsma. 2016. Introduction. In A companion to experimental philosophy, ed. J. Sytsma, and W. Buckwalter. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  2. Knobe, Joshua. 2016. Experimental philosophy is cognitive science. In A companion to experimental philosophy, ed. J. Sytsma, and W. Buckwalter. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  3. O’Neill, Elizabeth, and Edouard Machery. 2014. Experimental Philosophy: What is it good for? In Current controversies in experimental philosophy, ed. E. Machery, and E. O’Neill. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  4. Rose, David, and David Danks. 2013. In defense of a broad conception of experimental philosophy. Metaphilosophy 44(4): 512–532.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Schupbach, Jonah. 2015. Experimental explication. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research. doi: 10.1111/phpr.12207.Google Scholar
  6. Stich, Stich, and Kevin Tobia. 2016. Experimental philosophy and the philosophical tradition. In A companion to experimental philosophy, ed. J. Sytsma, and W. Buckwalter. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  7. Sytsma, Justin and Jonathan Livengood. 2016. The theory and practice of experimental philosophy. Peterborough, ON: Broadview.Google Scholar
  8. Sytsma, Justin, and Edouard Machery. 2013. Experimental philosophy. In Encyclopedia of philosophy and the social sciences, ed. B. Kaldis, 318–320. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Victoria University of WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand

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