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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 46, Issue 11, pp 3597–3606 | Cite as

Brief Report: DSM-5 Sensory Behaviours in Children With and Without an Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Dido Green
  • Susie Chandler
  • Tony Charman
  • Emily Simonoff
  • Gillian Baird
Brief Report

Abstract

Atypical responses to sensory stimuli are a new criterion in DSM-5 for the diagnosis of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) but are also reported in other developmental disorders. Using the Short Sensory profile (SSP) and Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised we compared atypical sensory behaviour (hyper- or hypo-reactivity to sensory input or unusual sensory interests) in children aged 10–14 years with (N = 116) or without an ASD but with special educational needs (SEN; N = 72). Atypical sensory behaviour was reported in 92 % of ASD and 67 % of SEN children. Greater sensory dysfunction was associated with increased autism severity (specifically restricted and repetitive behaviours) and behaviour problems (specifically emotional subscore) on teacher and parent Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaires but not with IQ.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Sensory reactivity Sensory interests DSM-5 Diagnostic criteria Behaviour 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to the children and families and the clinical teams in South Thames, whose participation and collaboration made the study possible.

Funding

This study was funded by the Wellcome Trust and the Department of Health (Grant Number 039/0026).

Author Contributions

All of the individuals listed as authors on this manuscript contributed to the study design, data collection and or data analysis along with manuscript preparation. All authors have read the manuscript and agreed to its submission for publication. All authors meet the appropriate authorship criteria, nobody who qualifies for authorship has been omitted, all contributors and funding sources have been properly acknowledged, and authors and contributors have approved the acknowledgement of their contributions.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

Dr Green declares that she has no conflict of interest. Dr Chandler declares that she has no conflict of interest. Prof Charman declares that he has no conflict of interest. Prof Simonoff declares that she has no conflict of interest. Prof Baird declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all parents for their and their child’s participation in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for RehabilitationOxford Brookes UniversityOxfordUK
  2. 2.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and NeuroscienceKing’s College LondonLondonUK
  3. 3.Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and NeuroscienceKing’s College LondonLondonUK
  4. 4.Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation TrustKing’s Health PartnersLondonUK
  5. 5.NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and NeuroscienceKing’s College LondonLondonUK

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