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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 45, Issue 9, pp 2792–2815 | Cite as

An Evaluation of the Quality of Research on Evidence-Based Practices for Daily Living Skills for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Ee Rea Hong
  • Jennifer B. Ganz
  • Jennifer Ninci
  • Leslie Neely
  • Whitney Gilliland
  • Margot Boles
Original Paper

Abstract

This study presents a literature review of interventions for improving daily living skills of individuals with ASD. This review investigated the quality of the design and evidence of the literature base and determined the state of the evidence base related to interventions for improving daily living skills of individuals with ASD. Included studies were evaluated to determine the overall quality of the evidence for each design within each article, based on the What Works Clearinghouse standards for single-case experimental design (Kratochwill et al. 2010), adapted by Maggin et al. (Remedial Spec Educ 34(1):44–58, 2013. doi: 10.1177/0741932511435176). As a result, video modeling was found to be an evidence-based practice. Limitations and implications for future research and for practitioners are discussed.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) Adaptive behavior skills Daily living skills Independent living skills Video modeling In vivo behavioral intervention Single-case research Single-subject research Systematic literature review What Works Clearinghouse 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The contents of this manuscript were developed under the Preparation of Leaders in Autism Across the Lifespan grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (Grant No. H325D110046).

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*Indicates study included in the analysis

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ee Rea Hong
    • 1
  • Jennifer B. Ganz
    • 1
  • Jennifer Ninci
    • 1
  • Leslie Neely
    • 1
  • Whitney Gilliland
    • 1
  • Margot Boles
    • 1
  1. 1.University of TsukubaTsukubaJapan

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