Advertisement

Journal of the History of Biology

, Volume 49, Issue 3, pp 559–580 | Cite as

At the Centennial of the Bacteriophage: Reviving the Overlooked Contribution of a Forgotten Pioneer, Richard Bruynoghe (1881–1957)

  • Alfons Billiau
Historiographic Essay

Abstract

The year 2015 marks the 100th anniversary of a publication by William Twort, in which he first described lysis of bacterial cultures by a filterable, self-replicating agent. In 1917, Félix d’Herelle, coined the name “bacteriophage” for the proposed agent. Two Belgian teams of microbiologists were among the few to critically examine the nature of the bacteriophage at that time. Although their experimental results agreed, their interpretations did not. Richard Bruynoghe (University of Louvain/Leuven) interpreted them as supportive of d’Herelle’s notion of an ultramicroscopic microorganism. Jules Bordet (University of Brussels) found the proposal of a complex organism unnecessary and saw the bacteriophage as a simple endogenous bacterial enzyme endowed with capacity to induce its own secretion as well as ability to cause lysis of the bacteria. Two decades would elapse before bacteriophages were visualized and confirmed to be organized particles. However, by that time, Bruynoghe’s work, that had only been published in short notes in society proceedings, was virtually forgotten. The present paper revives his original observations and arguments, while also recognizing that Bordet’s alternative hypothesis had scientific merit.

Keywords

Bacteriophage History Discovery Belgium Hypotheses 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ackermann, H.W. 2011. “The First Phage Electron Micrographs.” Bacteriophage 1: 225–227.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Adant, M. and Bruynoghe, R. 1932. “Le bactériophage du Bacillus subtilis sporulé.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 111: 1055–1056.Google Scholar
  3. Amsterdamska, O. 1991. “Stabilizing Instability: The Controversy over Cyclogenic Theories of Bacterial Variation During the Interwar Period.” Journal of the History of Biology 24: 191–222.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Appelmans, R. and Bruynoghe, R. 1921. “Le dosage du bactériophage.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 85: 1098–1099.Google Scholar
  5. Appelmans, R. and Wagemans, J. 1922. “Bactériophages de diverses provenances.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 86: 738–739.Google Scholar
  6. Bordet, J. 1923. “Microbic Transmissible Autolysis (The Cameron Prize Lecture Given Before the University of Edinburgh, 1922).” British Medical Journal 1: 175–178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Bordet, J. 1925. “Le problème de l’autolyse microbienne transmissible ou du bactériophage.” Annales de l’Institut Pasteur 39: 717–763.Google Scholar
  8. Bordet, J. 1931. “Theories of the Bacteriophage – Professor Bordet’s Croonian Lecture.” British Medical Journal 3652: 26–28.Google Scholar
  9. Bordet, J. and Ciuca, M. 1920a. “Exsudats leucocytaires et autolyse microbienne transmissible.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 83: 161–163.Google Scholar
  10. Bordet, J. and Ciuca, M. 1920b. “Le bactériophage de d’Herelle, sa production et son interprétation.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 83: 164–166.Google Scholar
  11. Bordet, J. and Ciuca, M. 1921a. “Déterminisme de l’autolyse microbienne transmissible.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 84: 276–278.Google Scholar
  12. Bordet, J. and Ciuca, M. 1921b. “Evolution des cultures de coli lysogène.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 84: 747–748.Google Scholar
  13. Bordet, J. and Ciuca, M. 1921c. “Remarques sur l’histoire des recherches concernant la lyse microbienne transmissible.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 84: 745–747.Google Scholar
  14. Bordet, J. and Ciuca, M. 1922. “Variation d’énergie du principe actif dans l’autolyse microbienne transmissible.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 87: 366–369.Google Scholar
  15. Brutsaert, P. 1923. “La virulence des bactériophages.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 89: 87–90.Google Scholar
  16. Brutsaert, P. 1924. “Le bactériophage dans les milieux gélatinés.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 90: 1292–1294.Google Scholar
  17. Bruynoghe, R. 1921. “Au sujet de la nature du principe bactériophage – II.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 85: 258–260.Google Scholar
  18. Bruynoghe, R. 1923. “Contribution à l’étude de la nature des bactériophages.” Bulletin de l’Academie Royale de Medecine de Belgique 3: 360–371.Google Scholar
  19. Bruynoghe, R. and Appelmans, R. 1922. “La neutralisation des bactériophages de provenance différente.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 86: 96–98.Google Scholar
  20. Bruynoghe, R. and Dubois, A. 1927a. “La parenté des microbes devenus résistants au bactériophage.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 96: 209–211.Google Scholar
  21. Bruynoghe, R. and Dubois, A. 1927b. “La précipitation spécifique des bactériophages.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 96: 211–212.Google Scholar
  22. Bruynoghe, R. and Maisin, J. 1921a. “Au sujet de l’unité du principe bactériophage.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 85: 1122–1124.Google Scholar
  23. Bruynoghe, R. and Maisin, J. 1921b. “Au sujet des microbes devenus résistants au principe bactériophage.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 84: 847–848.Google Scholar
  24. Bruynoghe, R. and Maisin, J. 1921c. “Essais thérapeutiques au moyen du bactériophage du staphylocoque.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 85: 1120–1121.Google Scholar
  25. Bruynoghe, R. and Maisin, J. 1921d. “Le principe bactériophage du staphylocoque.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 85: 1118–1120.Google Scholar
  26. Bruynoghe, R. and Wagemans, J. 1923. “Sur la complexité de certains bactériophages.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 89: 85–87.Google Scholar
  27. d’Herelle, F. 1917. “Sur un microbe invisible antagoniste des bacilles dysentériques.” Comptes Rendus Académie Sciences Paris 165: 373–375.Google Scholar
  28. d’Herelle, F. 1918. “Technique de la recherche du microbe filtrant bactériophage.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 81: 1160–1162.Google Scholar
  29. d’Herelle, F. 1921. Le bactériophage: son rôle dans l’immunité. Paris:Masson & Cie.Google Scholar
  30. Duckworth, D. H. 1976. “Who Discovered Bacteriophage?’ Bacteriological Reviews 40: 793–802.Google Scholar
  31. Gratia, A. 1921. “De la signification des colonies de bactériophages de d’Herelle.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 84: 753–754.Google Scholar
  32. Gratia, A. 1922. “The Twort-d’Herelle Phenomenon: II. Lysis and Microbic Variation.” Journal of Experimental Medicine 35: 287–302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Gratia, A. and Bordet, J. 1921. “De l’adaptation héréditaire du colibacille à l’autolyse microbienne transmissible.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 84: 750–751.Google Scholar
  34. Kabeshima, T. 1920. “Sur un ferment d’immunité bactériolysant, du mécanisme d’immunité infectieuse intestinale, de la nature du dit ‘microbe filtrant bactériophage’ de d’Herelle.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 83: 219–221.Google Scholar
  35. Kouo Ngen, T., Wagemans, J., and Bruynoghe, R. 1922. “Résistance des bactériophages à la chaleur.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 87: 1253–1255.Google Scholar
  36. Lavigne, R. and Robben, J. 2012. “Professor Dr. Richard Bruynoghe.” Bacteriophage 2: 1–4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Levine, A. J. 1996. “The Origins of Virology.” B. N. Fields, D. M. Fields, P. M. Knipe, and P. M. Howley (eds.), Fields Virology. Philadelphia: Lippingcott-Raven, pp. 1–14.Google Scholar
  38. Maisin, J. and Bruynoghe, R. 1921a. “Adaptation du bactériophage.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 84: 468–470.Google Scholar
  39. Maisin, J. and Bruynoghe, R. 1921b. “Au sujet de la nature du principe bactériophage – I.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 84: 467–468.Google Scholar
  40. Maisin, J. and Bruynoghe, R. 1921c. “Au sujet du principe bactériophage et des anticorps.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 84: 755–756.Google Scholar
  41. Sanger, F., Air, G. M., Barrell, B. G., Brown, N. L., Coulson, A. R., Fiddes, C. A., Hutchison, C. A., Slocombe, P. M., and Smith, M. 1977. “Nucleotide Sequence of Bacteriophage Phi X174 DNA.” Nature 265: 687–695.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Smith, H. O., Hutchison, III, C. A., Pfannkoch, C., and Venter, J. C. 2003. “Generating a Synthetic Genome by Whole Genome Assembly: phiX174 Bacteriophage from Synthetic Oligonucleotides.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 100: 15440–15445.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Stent, G. S. 1971. Molecular Genetics – An Introductory Narrative. San Francisco: W.H. Freeman & Cy.Google Scholar
  44. Summers, W. C. 1991. “From Culture as Organism to Organism as Cell: Historical Origins of Bacterial Genetics.” Journal of the History of Biology 24: 171–190.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Summers, W. C. 2011. “In the Beginning.” Bacteriophage 1: 50–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Summers, W. C. 2012. “The Strange History of Phage Therapy.” Bacteriophage 2: 130–133.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Twort, F. W. 1915. “An Investigation on the Nature of Ultra-Microscopic Viruses.” Lancet 186: 1241–1243.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. van Helvoort, T. 1992. “Bacteriological and Physiological Research Styles in the Early Controversy on the Nature of the Bacteriophage Phenomenon.” Medical History 36: 243–270.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Wagemans, J. and Bruynoghe, R. 1922. “Au sujet de la constitution du bactériophage.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 87: 1244–1245.Google Scholar
  50. Wollmann, E. and Brutsaert, P. 1925. “L’autonomie antigène des bactériophages.” Comptes Rendus des séances de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 92: 1284–1285.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Rega InstituteUniversity of LeuvenLeuvenBelgium

Personalised recommendations