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Empirica

, Volume 41, Issue 3, pp 577–587 | Cite as

Institutions of conflict management and economic growth revisited: a short note

  • Friedrich Schneider
  • Stefan D. Haigner
  • Stefan Jenewein
  • Florian Wakolbinger
Original Paper
  • 236 Downloads

Abstract

We study the effects of institutions of conflict management like corporatism, trust, civic norms and group membership on economic growth. By employing Schneider and Wagner’s (Kyklos 54:509–532, 2001) model and data from 1990–2011, we show that corporatism has (still) a positive coordination effect and a negative rent-seeking effect. The total effect is positive for most countries.

Keywords

Corporatism Conflict management Economic growth 

JEL Classification

C23 D72 O43 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Friedrich Schneider
    • 1
  • Stefan D. Haigner
    • 3
  • Stefan Jenewein
    • 3
  • Florian Wakolbinger
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsUniversity of LinzLinzAustria
  2. 2.Gesellschaft für Angewandte Wirtschaftsforschung (GAW)InnsbruckAustria
  3. 3.Department of Public EconomicsUniversity of InnsbruckInnsbruckAustria

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