An investigation on primary school students’ dispositions towards programming with game-based learning

Abstract

In the modern education system, new technological teaching aids are used to support learning, to increase motivation and adaptation of students. Game-based Learning (GBL) is one of such aids that it can be successfully integrated to improve teaching and learning in diverse courses. In computer science courses, the concept of programming is found confusing and difficult to understand by students. This study is conducted to investigate and analyze the disposition of 5th grade primary school students on programming through a digital game-play. Sixty-three 5th grade primary school students, with little or no programming knowledge, performed various activities through a digital game framework. The study is based on a descriptive survey model and was carried out by using convergent mixed method design for data collection process. The data were collected through quantitative and qualitative approaches consecutively after the students were experimenting on the given digital game-based activity. The findings indicated that digital game-play helped the students to understand the concept of programming and it is observed that students have developed positive disposition towards programming through game-based activities even if they can have preconceptions.

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DEMİRKIRAN, M.C., TANSU HOCANIN, F. An investigation on primary school students’ dispositions towards programming with game-based learning. Educ Inf Technol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10639-021-10430-5

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Keywords

  • Game-based learning
  • Computational thinking
  • Computer science
  • Information communication technology (ICT), Minecraft