Integrating ICT into schools in Sub-Saharan Africa: from teachers’ capacity building to classroom implementation

Abstract

This study followed up on a selected cohort of 4945 Science, Technology, English and Mathematics (STEM) teacher participants from six Sub-Saharan African countries namely: Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Ethiopia, Ghana and Nigeria. The teachers were involved in an instructional digital professional development programme targeted at building their capacity to embed ICT into school organizational and curriculum practices. This study sought to evaluate the impact of the ICT- instructional professional development programme in relation to the quality and the extent of the teachers’ transfer of the programme’s ideas from capacity building to classroom instructional practices. Data for the study were collected using semi-structured survey instrument and diaries kept to maintain records of activities and events during the period of implementation. Findings revealed that the teachers expressed general satisfaction with content and processes of the training programme; however, essential conditions to support transfer of the training’s ideas to school level seemed not adequate during the period of implementation. Implications for effective professional development in integrating ICT into school organization and curriculum practices that have sustainable impact on teaching and learning particularly in Sub-Saharan regions and similar contexts are discussed.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

Fig. 1
Fig. 2
Fig. 3
Fig. 4
Fig. 5

References

  1. Agyei, D. D. (2013). Analysis of technology integration in teacher education in Ghana. Journal of Global Initiatives: Policy, Pedagogy, Perspective, 8(1 & 2), 69–86.

    Google Scholar 

  2. Agyei, D. D., & Voogt, J. (2012). Developing technological pedagogical content knowledge in pre-service mathematics teachers through collaborative design. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 28(4), 547–564.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  3. Agyei, D. D., & Voogt, J. (2014). Examining factors affecting beginning teachers’ transfer of learning of ICT-enhanced learning activities in their teaching practice. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 30(1), 92–105.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  4. Baldwin, T. T., & Ford, J. K. (1988). Transfer of training: A review and directions for future research. Personnel Psychology, 41, 63–105.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  5. Baylor, A. L., & Ritchie, D. (2002). What factors facilitate teacher skill, teacher morale, and perceived student learning in technology-using classrooms? Computers & Education, 39, 395–414.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  6. Creswell, J. W., Plano Clark, V. L., Gutmann, M., & Hanson, W. (Eds.). (2003). Advanced mixed methods research designs. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Ebersole, S., & Vorndam, M. (2003). Adoption of computer based instructional methodologies: A case study. International Journal of E-Learning, 2(2), 15–20.

    Google Scholar 

  8. Ely, D. P. (1999). Conditions that facilitate the implementation of educational technology innovations. Educational Technology, 39, 23–27.

    Google Scholar 

  9. Fishman, B., & Krajcik, J. S. (2003). What does it mean to create sustainable science curriculum innovation? Science Education, 87(4), 564–573.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  10. Fullan, M. (2007). The new meaning of educational change (4th ed.). New York: Teachers College Press.

    Google Scholar 

  11. Goktas, Y., Yıldırım, Z., & Yıldırım, S. (2008). A review of ICT related courses in preservice teacher education programmes. Asia Pacific Education Review, 9, 168–179.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  12. Guskey, T. R. (1985). Implementing mastery learning. Belmont: Wadsworth.

    Google Scholar 

  13. Guskey, T. R. (1986). Staff development and the process of teacher change. Educational Researcher, 15(5), 5–12.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  14. Guskey, T. R. (1990). Cooperative mastery learning strategies. Elementary School Journal, 91(1), 33–42.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  15. Guskey, T. R. (1991). Enhancing the effectiveness of professional development programs. Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation, 2(3), 239–247.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  16. Guskey, T. R. (1998). The age of our accountability. Journal of Staff Development, 19(4), 1–9.

    Google Scholar 

  17. Guskey, T. R. (2002). Does it make a difference? Evaluating professional development. Educational Leadership, 59(6), 45–51.

    Google Scholar 

  18. Guskey, T. R. (2015). On your mark: Challenging the conventions of grading and reporting. Bloomington: Solution Tree.

    Google Scholar 

  19. Guskey, T. R., & Sparks, D. (1996). Exploring the relationship between staff development and improvements in student learning. Journal of Staff Development, 17(4), 1–6.

    Google Scholar 

  20. Hennessy, S., Harrison, D., & Wamakote, L. (2010). Teacher factors influencing classroom use of ICT in Sub-Saharan Africa. Itupale Online Journal of African Studies, 2, 39–54.

    Google Scholar 

  21. Kay, R. H. (2006). Evaluating strategies used to incorporate technology into pre-service education: A review of the literature. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 38, 383–408.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  22. Kelz, A. (2011). Bridging the gap – from teacher to e-teacher. In S. Greener & A. Rospigliosi (Eds.), Proceedings of the 10th European conference on e-learning (pp. 363–369). Brighton: Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited.

    Google Scholar 

  23. Meelissen, M. (Ed.). (2008). Computer attitudes and competencies among primary and secondary school students. New York: Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  24. Meloncon, L. (2007). Exploring electronic landscapes: Technical communication, online learning, and instructor preparedness. Technical Communication Quarterly, 16(1), 31–53.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  25. Miles, M. B., & Huberman, A. M. (1994). An expanded source book: Qualitative data analysis (2nd ed.). London: Sage Publications.

    Google Scholar 

  26. Morse, J. M. (1991). Approaches to qualitative-quantitative methodological triangulation. Nursing Research, 40, 120–123.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  27. Niederhauser, D. S., Howard, S. K., Voogt, J., Agyei, D. D., Laferriere, T., Tondeur, J., & Cox, M. J. (2018). Sustainability and scalability in educational technology initiatives: Research-informed practice. Technology, Knowledge and Learning, 23, 507–523.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  28. Ottevanger, W., van den Akker, J. J. H., & de Feiter, L. (2007). Developing science, mathematics and ICT education in Sub-Saharan Africa (SMICT): Patterns and promising practices. World Bank Working Paper, 101, 1–84.

    Google Scholar 

  29. Paraskeva, F., Bouta, H., & Papagianna, A. (2008). Individual characteristics and computer self-efficacy in secondary education teachers to integrate technology in educational practice. Computer and Education, 50(3), 1084–1091.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  30. Philipsen, B., Tondeur, J., & Zhu, C. (2016). Exploring digital didactics: An explorative case study on learning to teach online. In J. Novotná & A. Jančařík (Eds.), Proceedings of the 15th European conference on e-learning (pp. 555–561). Prague: Charles University Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited.

    Google Scholar 

  31. Redmond, P. (2011). From face-to-face teaching to online teaching: Pedagogical transitions. In ASCILITE 2011:28th annual conference of the Australasian society for computers in learning in tertiary education: Changing demands, changing directions (pp. 1050–1060). Hobart: ASCILITE.

  32. Saks, A. M. (2002). So what is a good transfer of training estimate? A reply to Fitzpatrick. The Industrial-Organizational Psychologist, 39, 29–30.

    Google Scholar 

  33. Todorova, A., & Osburg, T. (2009). Factors for the sustainability of a teacher professional development programme for technology integration. Paper presented at the London international conference on education. London.

  34. United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA). (2005). Economic report on Africa 2005: Meeting the challenges of unemployment and poverty in Africa. Addis Ababa: UNECA.

    Google Scholar 

  35. Webb, M., & Cox, M. (2004). A review of pedagogy rated to information and communications technology. Technology, Pedagogy and Education, 13(3), 235–286.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  36. Yamnill, S., & McLean, G. N. (2001). Theories supporting transfer of training. Human Resource Development Quarterly, 12(2), 195–208.

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Douglas Darko Agyei.

Additional information

Publisher’s note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Agyei, D.D. Integrating ICT into schools in Sub-Saharan Africa: from teachers’ capacity building to classroom implementation. Educ Inf Technol (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10639-020-10253-w

Download citation

Keywords

  • Technology integration
  • Professional development
  • Capacity building, transfer of learning