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Journal of Business Ethics

, Volume 130, Issue 1, pp 29–44 | Cite as

Understanding Moral Courage Through a Feminist and Developmental Ethic of Care

  • Sheldene Simola
Article

Abstract

During the last decade, scholars of business ethics have become increasingly interested in the construct of moral courage. However, despite the importance of understanding both moral courage and the factors that might facilitate its expression, this topic has still received relatively limited study and several areas have been identified as being in need of further exploration. These include the need to investigate courage from within a full range of theoretical frameworks, including feminist ones, from within which, little is yet known about this construct; the need for developmental perspectives on moral courage; and, the identification of developmentally informed approaches for facilitating its expression. This article responds to these needs by providing a conceptual framework for understanding moral courage through a feminist and developmental ethic of care, and by describing the implications of this framework for the expression of moral courage in business and organizational settings.

Keywords

Care ethics Feminism Development Moral courage Voice Whistleblowing 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Business Administration ProgramTrent UniversityPeterboroughCanada

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