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Amino Acids

, Volume 50, Issue 6, pp 755–763 | Cite as

Proanthocyanidin-containing polyphenol extracts from fruits prevent the inhibitory effect of hydrogen sulfide on human colonocyte oxygen consumption

  • Mireille Andriamihaja
  • Annaïg Lan
  • Martin Beaumont
  • Marta Grauso
  • Martin Gotteland
  • Edgar Pastene
  • Maria Jose Cires
  • Catalina Carrasco-Pozo
  • Daniel Tomé
  • François BlachierEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a metabolic end product synthesized by the microbiota from l-cysteine, has been shown to act at low micromolar concentration as a mineral oxidative substrate in colonocytes while acting as an inhibitor of oxygen consumption at higher luminal concentrations (65 µM and above). From the previous works showing that polyphenols can bind volatile sulfur compounds, we hypothesized that different dietary proanthocyanidin-containing polyphenol (PACs) plant extracts might modulate the inhibitory effect of H2S on colonocyte respiration. Using the model of human HT-29 Glc–/+ cell colonocytes, we show here that pre-incubation of 65 µM of the H2S donor NaHS with the different polyphenol extracts markedly reduced the inhibitory effect of NaHS on colonocyte oxygen consumption. Our studies on HT-29 Glc–/+ cell respiration performed in the absence or the presence of PACs reveal rapid binding of H2S with the sulfide-oxidizing unit and slower binding of H2S to the cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV of the respiratory chain). Despite acute inhibition of colonocyte respiration, no measurable effect of NaHS on paracellular permeability was recorded after 24 h treatment using the Caco-2 colonocyte monolayer model. The results are discussed in the context of the binding of excessive bacterial metabolites by unabsorbed dietary compounds and of the capacity of colonocytes to adapt to changing luminal environment.

Keywords

Hydrogen sulfide Proanthocyanidins Polyphenols Colonocyte Oxygen consumption 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank the financial support from Evaluation-Orientation de la Coopération Scientifique (Grant C12S01) and Fondecyt 1120290 as well as the financial support from AgroParisTech, INRA, Université Paris-Saclay, University of Chile in Santiago, and University of Concepcion.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mireille Andriamihaja
    • 1
  • Annaïg Lan
    • 1
  • Martin Beaumont
    • 1
  • Marta Grauso
    • 1
  • Martin Gotteland
    • 2
  • Edgar Pastene
    • 3
  • Maria Jose Cires
    • 2
  • Catalina Carrasco-Pozo
    • 2
  • Daniel Tomé
    • 1
  • François Blachier
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.UMR 914 PNCA, AgroParisTech, INRA, Université Paris-SaclayParisFrance
  2. 2.Department of Nutrition, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of ChileSantiagoChile
  3. 3.Laboratory of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of PharmacyUniversity of ConcepcionConcepcionChile

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