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Wetlands

, Volume 3, Issue 1, pp 108–119 | Cite as

Habitat development utilizing dredged material at Barren Island Dorchester County, Maryland

  • H. Glenn Earhart
  • E. W. Garbisch
Article
  • 29 Downloads

Abstract

In the fall of 1981, the Corps of Engineers dredged the Federal channel from Chesapeake Bay to Honga River, Dorchester County, Maryland. Approximately 135, 831 m3 of fine-grained sediments were hydraulically deposited at a single unconfined location in shallow water from 1,188–1,859 m from the dredge. Fish and wildlife habitats were developed by controlling the direction of the discharge pipe to provide designed dredged material elevations and configuration, and by conducting post-disposal landscaping. Ten months following dredging, the stable dredged material placement site consisted of ca. 4.4 ha of floweringSpartina alterniflora (247–652 stems/m2) derived from seeding, ca. 2.0 ha ofSpartina patens (30 to 689 stems/m2) derived from transplanting, ca. 2.0 ha of unvegetated bird nesting area at elevations up to 0.6 m above theS. patens, 2.4 ha of tidal flat sparsely vegetated byS. alterniflora, and a 4 ha tidal pond. The nesting area was abundantly used by least terns during the spring and early summer of 1982. The project costs were approximately 40% less than a traditional confined dredged material placement option.

Keywords

Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Oyster Shell Discharge Pipe Disposal Option Mean High Water 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Society of Wetland Scientists 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Glenn Earhart
    • 1
  • E. W. Garbisch
    • 2
  1. 1.U. S. Army Corps of EngineersBaltimore
  2. 2.Environmental Concern Inc.St. Michaels

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