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Journal of Computing in Higher Education

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 78–90 | Cite as

A pointing out and naming paradigm to support radiological teaching and case-oriented learning

  • J. Van Cleynenbreugel
  • E. Bellon
  • G. Marchal
  • P. Suetens
Article

Abstract

The simple but powerful idea of annotating images by pointing out and naming is ubiquitous in radiological practice. It is used both by a senior radiologist transferring knowledge to juniors and by any radiologist explaining a case. Pointing out can be realized by pointing devices (finger, pencil, arrows); naming mostly consists of a spoken comment or of a written text. Therefore, radiological examination is multimedia by nature, involving images, annotations, voice, and text. In this paper we discuss an implementation of this paradigm in a UNIX workstation-based multimedia environment for case-oriented learning and teaching. We focus on the authoring and the presentation of radiological study material within this system. Possible scenarios for radiological teaching are discussed. Results from validation experiments conclude the paper.

Keywords

radiological visualization hypermedia annotations case-oriented learning 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Van Cleynenbreugel
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • E. Bellon
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • G. Marchal
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • P. Suetens
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Johan Van Cleynenbreugel, Laboratory for Medical Imaging Research, ESAT+Radiologie, Katholieke Universiteit LeuvenUniversity Hospital GasthuisbergLeuvenBelgium
  2. 2.Department of Electrical Engineering, ESATKatholieke UniversiteitLeuvenBelgium
  3. 3.Department of Radiology, University Hospital GasthuisbergKatholieke UniversiteitLeuvenBelgium

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