Advertisement

Economic Botany

, Volume 42, Issue 3, pp 376–406 | Cite as

Plants used for pest control in China: A literature review

  • R. Z. Yang
  • C. S. Tang
Article

Abstract

Using plant material to control pests may alleviate the burden of heavy reliance on synthetic pesticides. In China, the rich tradition and knowledge of herbal medicine, combined with an organized but short- lived effort of using indigenous pesticidal plants, resulted in an accumulation of literature in the late 1950s. In this review, a table containing 267 pesticidal plants is compiled to provide a glimpse of the Chinese experience.

Keywords

Economic Botany Rhizoctonia Solani Economic Plant Azadirachta Indica Neem Tree 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Zusammenfassung

Plantes Utilisées en Tant que Pesticide en Chine. L’utilisation de materiel végétal dans le contrôl parasitaire peut soulager considiralement l’important besoin de pesticides de synthèse. La Chine, avec sa richesse de tradition et de connaissance de Ia médecine avec les plantes, mené un effort organisé mais de court-terme vers lafin des années 50. Cette revue, une table de 267 plantes pesticides a été redigee dans le but de donner une idée de l’experience Chinoise.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literature Cited

  1. 1.
    Ahmed, S., and M. Grainge. 1986. Potential of the neem tree(Azadirachta indica) for pest control and rural development. Econ. Bot. 40:201–209.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bureau of Commerce, Hunan Province. 1959. Hunan yesheng zhiwu (Wild plants in Hunan). Hunan Science and Technology Press, Changsha, China.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Bureau of Commerce, Jiangsu Province and Sun Yat-Sen Botanical Garden, Nanjing Institute of Botany, Academia Sinica. 1959. Jiangsu yesheng zhiwu zhi (Compendium of jiangsu wild plants). Jiangsu People ’s Press, Nanjing, China.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Bureau of Health, Yunnan Province. 1960. Yesheng zhiwu shouce (Handbook of wild plants). Yunnan People ’s Press, Kunming, China.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Bureau of Health, Zhejiang Province. 1958. Zhejiang shachong zhiwu tu shuo (1) (Illustrated book of insecticidal plants in Zheijiang. Vol. I). Science, Technology and Medicine Press, Shanghai, China.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Chinese Agricultural Heritage Study Group, Nanjing Agriculture College, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences. 1984. Zhongguo nongxue she (The history of Chinese agriculture). 2 vols. Nanjing, China.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Editorial Board of Economic Plants in Shangdong. 1978. Shangdong jingji zhiwu (Economic plants in Shangdong). Shangdong People ’s Press, Jinan, China.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Editorial Board of Economic Plants in Henan. n.d. Henan jingji zhiwu zhe chu gao (Compendium of economic plants in Henan, preliminary edition). Publisher unknown.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Editorial Board of Zhongguo Tu Nongyau Zhi. 1959. Zhongguo Tu Nongyau Zhi (Compendium of Chinese indigenous pesticides). Science Press, Beijing, China.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Grainge, M., S. Ahmed, W. C. Mitchell, and J. W. Hylin. 1985. Plant species reportedly possessing pest-control properties’ An EWC/UH database. Resource Systems Institute, East-West Center, Honolulu, Hawaii.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Guangxi Station, South China Institute of Botany, Academia Sinica and Society of Science and Technology, Guiling, eds. 1958. Guangxi yesen zhiyuan zhiwu (Wild plant resources in Guongxi). Publisher unknown. Guiling, China.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Huang, H.-T. 1986. Plants and insects in man’ s service. Pages 471–553in J. Needham, ed., Science and civilisation in China. Vol. 6, Part 1, Sec. 38. Cambridge Univ. Press, London.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Institute of Biology, Northwestern Division, Academia Sinica, and The Department of Biology, Northwestern University. 1960. Ankang diqu jingji zhiwu (Economic plants in Ankang Region). Shangxi People ’s Press, Xian, China.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Institute of Forestry and Soils, Academia Sinica, Liaoning Bureau of Commerce, Liaoning Bureau of Forestry, and Shengyang College of Pharmacology. 1960. Liaoning jingji zhiwu zhi (Compendium of economic plants in Liaoning). Liaoning People’ s Press, Shengyang, China.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Jacobson, M., and D. G. Crosby, eds. 1971. Naturally occurring insecticides. Marcel Dekker, New York.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Jai, S.-S. 533-544 A.D. Chi Ming Yao Shu (Important arts for the people’s welfare). Publisher unknown.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Lin, Q. S. 1977. Zhongcaoyaochengfengyenjiu (Research on the chemical constituents of Chinese herbal medicine). Science Press, Beijing, China.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Liu, K. Z., J. Zhou, and R. Z. Ou. 1978. Taiwan yesen ke shi zhiwu (Edible wild plants in Taiwan). National Chinese Pharmaceutical Institute, Taiwan.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Nanjing Pharmaceutical School, ed. 1979. Dictionary of Chinese herbal medicine (Zhongyao da cidian). Shanghai Science and Technology Press, Shanghai, China.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Office of Guizhou Wild Plants Survey. 1960. Guizhou jinji zhiwu tushuo, (1) (Pictorials of economic plants in Guizhou. Vol. 1). Guizhou People’s Press, Guiyang, China.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    —. 1960. Guizhou jinji zhiwu tushuo, (3) (Pictorials of economic plants in Guizhou. Vol. 3). Guizhou People’s Press, Guiyang, China.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    —. 1960. Guizhoujinjizhiwu tushuo, (4) (Pictorials of economic plants in Guizhou. Vol. 4). Guizhou People ’s Press, Guiyang, China.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    —. 1960. Guizhou jinji zhiwu tushuo, (5) (Pictorials of economic plants in Guizhou. Vol. 5). Guizhou People ’s Press, Guiyang, China.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    —. 1960. Guizhou jinji zhiwu tushuo, (6) (Pictorials of economic plants in Guizhou. Vol. 6). Guizhou People’s Press, Guiyang, China.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Secoy, D. M., and A. E. Smith. 1983. Use of plants in control of agricultural and domestic pests. Econ. Bot. 37:28–57.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Sichuan Institute of Agricultural Production, Academia Sinica. 1963. Sichuan yesheng jingji zhiwu zhi (Compendium of wild economic plants in Sichuan). 2 vols. Sichuan People’s Press, Chengdu, China.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    South China Institute of Botany, Academia Sinica. 1959. Yesheng shachong zhiwu tushuo (Illustrated book on wild pesticidal plants). Guangdong People’s Press, Guangzhou, China.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Unknown. East Han Dynasty, 25-220 A.D. Shengnong ben cao jing (Classical pharmacopoeia of the heavenly husbandman). Publisher unknown.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Zhou, T. Y., and Z. Z. Ding. 1956. Nanjing minjian yaocao (Folk herbal medicine in Nanjing). Science Press, Beijing, China.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Zhu, Z. S. 1964. Hainan zhuyao jinji shumu (Major economic trees in Hainan). Agricultural Press, Beijing, China.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The New York Botanical Garden 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Z. Yang
    • 1
  • C. S. Tang
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Plant ResourcesSouth China Institute of BotanyAcademia Sinica, GuangzhouChina
  2. 2.Department of Agricultural BiochemistryUniversity of HawaiiHonoluluUSA

Personalised recommendations