The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

Investment Planning

  • Joseph Halevi
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_827

Abstract

The theories discussed here consist of two complementary formulations originating in India and in the United Kingdom in the 1950s and 1960s. Both deal with investment planning when development starts with virtually no capital goods industry. Thus they represent an expansion of the model of the Soviet economist Feld’man, since in the latter the economy did possess an investment sector albeit in a limited dimension (Feld’man 1928a, b).

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© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph Halevi
    • 1
  1. 1.