The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

Indicators

  • V. Zarnowitz
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_714

Abstract

Economic indicators, as a general category, are descriptive and anticipatory data used as tools for the analysis of business conditions and forecasting. There are potentially as many subsets of indicators in this sense as there are different targets at which they can be directed. For example, some indicators may relate to employment, others to inflation.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access

Bibliography

  1. Auerbach, A. 1982. The index of leading economic indicators: ‘Measurement without theory’ thirty-five years later. Review of Economics and Statistics 64(4): 589–595.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Burns, A.F. 1950. New facts on business cycles. New York: National Bureau of Economic Research.Google Scholar
  3. Burns, A.F., and W.C. Mitchell. 1946. Measuring business cycles. New York: Columbia University Press for the National Bureau of Economic Research.Google Scholar
  4. Haberler, G. 1964. Prosperity and depression, New ed. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Hymans, S. 1973. Brookings papers on economic activity, vol. 2. Washington, DC: Bookings Institution.Google Scholar
  6. Klein, P.A., and G.H. Moore. 1985. Monitoring business cycles in market-oriented countries. Cambridge, MA: Ballinger for the National Bureau of Economic Research.Google Scholar
  7. Mitchell, W.C., and A.F. Burns. 1938. Statistical indicators of cyclical revivals. Bulletin 89. New York: National Bureau of Economic Research.Google Scholar
  8. Moore, G.H. 1950. Statistical indicators of cyclical revivals and recessions. Occasional paper no. 31. New York: National Bureau of Economic Research.Google Scholar
  9. Moore, G.H. 1961. Business cycles indicators. New York: National Bureau of Economic Research.Google Scholar
  10. Moore, G.H. 1983. Business cycles, inflation, and forecasting, 2nd ed. Cambridge, MA: Ballinger for the National Bureau of Economic Research.Google Scholar
  11. Moore, G.H., and J. Shiskin. 1967. Indicators of business expansions and contractions. New York: National Bureau of Economic Research.Google Scholar
  12. Neftci, S. 1979. Leading-lag relations, exogeneity, and prediction of economic time series. Econometrica 47(1): 101–113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Zarnowitz, V. (ed.). 1972. The business cycle today. New York: National Bureau of Economic Research.Google Scholar
  14. Zarnowitz, V. 1985. Recent work on business cycles in historical perspective: A review of theories and evidence. Journal of Economic Literature 23(2): 523–280.Google Scholar
  15. Zarnowitz, V., and C. Boschan. 1975a. Cyclical indicators: An evaluation and new leading index. Business Conditions Digest: v–xxii.Google Scholar
  16. Zarnowitz, V., and C. Boschan. 1975b. New composite indexes of coincident and lagging indicators. Business Conditions Digest: v–xxiv.Google Scholar
  17. Zarnowitz, V., and G.H. Moore. 1977. The recession and recovery of 1973–1976. Explorations in Economic Research 4(4): 471–557.Google Scholar
  18. Zarnowitz, V., and G.H. Moore. 1981. The timing and severity of the 1980 recession. NBER Reporter, 19–21.Google Scholar
  19. Zarnowitz, V., and G.H. Moore. 1982. Sequential signals of recession and recovery. Journal of Business 55(1): 57–85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Zarnowitz
    • 1
  1. 1.