The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

World Wars, Economics of

  • Stephen Broadberry
  • Mark Harrison
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_2607

Abstract

This article focuses on the role of economic factors in explaining the outcomes of the two world wars. In both wars, the scale of resources mobilized was decisive, leaving little room for other factors that feature prominently in narrative accounts, such as national differences in war preparations, war leadership, military organization and morale. The economic advantage of the Allies was not just in size, but also in the quality of their resources, reflected in average real incomes per head of their populations before the wars. We also quantify the economic effects of the wars within a national balance sheet framework.

Keywords

Coalitions Collectivization Famine Fiscal mobilization Globalization Lend-Lease Peasant economy Rationing Subsistence Tariffs World wars Economics of the War and economics 

JEL Classifications

H5 
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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Broadberry
    • 1
  • Mark Harrison
    • 1
  1. 1.