The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

Stalinism, Political Economy of

  • Paul R. Gregory
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_2567

Abstract

This article describes the economic working arrangements put in place in the Soviet Union in the early 1930s by Stalin from the vantage point of Mises’ and Hayek’s scepticism about the feasibility of socialism. It describes the high-level management of the economy, the dictator’s curse, the ad hoc nature of planning, the handling of principal–agent problems, the management of worker morale, the manner in which investment was maximized, the dictator’s aversion to rules, and the use of coercion to achieve economic goals. Stalin’s use of forced labour in his Gulag system is described as coercion failure.

Keywords

Keyword Term 

JEL Classification

P3 
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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul R. Gregory
    • 1
  1. 1.