The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

Chemical Industry

  • Ashish Arora
  • Alfonso Gambardella
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_2526

Abstract

The chemical industry is among the largest manufacturing industries; its products range from acids to intermediate chemicals such as synthetic fibres and plastics, and to final products such as soaps, cosmetics, paints and fertilizers. Perhaps as a result, the chemical industry is under-studied by economists, though not by economic and business historians (e.g., Hounshell and Smith 1988).

Keywords

Chemical industry Complementarities Innovation Licensing of technology Patents Petrochemical industry Technical change Vertical integration 
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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ashish Arora
    • 1
  • Alfonso Gambardella
    • 1
  1. 1.