The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

Economic Demography

  • Allen C. Kelley
  • Robert M. Schmidt
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_2253

Abstract

Economic demography is an area of study that examines the determinants and consequences of demographic change, including fertility, mortality, marriage, divorce, location (urbanisation, migration, density), age, gender, ethnicity, population size and population growth. This article reviews and critically evaluates important macroeconomic dimensions of the ‘population debates’ between the ‘optimists’ and the ‘pessimists’ since 1950. It concludes with an examination of demography in the popular ‘convergence’ growth models of the 1990s.

Keywords

Adult equivalency Ageing Agricultural growth and population change Capital accumulation Convergence Demographic drag Demographic gift Demographic transition Diffusion of technology Diminishing returns Dismal science Economic demography Economic development Economic growth Education Endogenous growth Fertility Free rider problem Human capital Innovation Kuznets, S. Labour productivity Learning-by-doing Life expectancy Life-cycle modelling Malthus., T. R. Mortality Population density Population growth Population size Renewable resources Research and development Rule of law Saving Simon, J. L. Subsistence Technical change 

JEL Classifications

J10 
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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allen C. Kelley
    • 1
  • Robert M. Schmidt
    • 1
  1. 1.