The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

Stamp, Josiah Charles (1880–1941)

  • J. R. N. Stone
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_1645

Abstract

Stamp was born on 21 June 1880 in London, and was killed in an air raid on 16 April 1941. He was knighted in 1920, and given the title Baron Stamp of Shortlands, in 1938. In 1926 he was made a Fellow of the British Academy. He entered the Civil Service as a clerk in 1896, and spent most of the next 23 years in the Department of Inland Revenue, rising to Assistant Secretary in 1916. While he was there, he taught himself economics, obtaining in 1911 a first-class external BSc from London University, and in 1916, under the supervision of A.L. Bowley, a DSc from the London School of Economics with his thesis on British Incomes and Property (Stamp 1916). He left the Civil Service in 1919, becoming Secretary and Director of Nobel Industries (later ICI). He was Chairman of the London Midland and Scottish Railway from 1926 to 1941, and from 1928 he was Director of the Bank of England.

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References

  1. Beveridge, W. 1959. Stamp, Josiah Charles. In Dictionary of national biography 1941–1950, ed. L.G. Wickham Legg and E.T. Williams. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
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  4. Jones, J.H. 1964. Josiah Stamp, public servant: The life of the first Baron Stamp of Shortlands. New York/London: Pitman.Google Scholar
  5. Mogey, J. 1968. Stamp, Josiah Charles. In International encyclopedia of the social services, vol. 15. London/New York: Macmillan/Free Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. R. N. Stone
    • 1
  1. 1.