The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics

2018 Edition
| Editors: Macmillan Publishers Ltd

Renewable Resources

  • Colin W. Clark
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95189-5_1562

Abstract

A resource stock may be termed ‘renewable’ if constant periodic removals from it can be indefinitely prolonged. A renewable resource may be further classified as depletable or nondepletable, according to whether or not its productivity is affected by the level of exploitation. Biological resources such as fish, bird and animal populations, forests, grasslands and agricultural soils, provide examples of the depletable type, while surface water resources, solar and geothermal energy may be classified as nondepletable.

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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Colin W. Clark
    • 1
  1. 1.